Tuniver.se - Your music. Discovered.
Get TuneUp Companion!

Artist: Peter Frampton

Peter Frampton

Bio

Peter Frampton (born 22 April 1950 in Beckenham, Kent) is a British musician, best known today for his multi-platinum selling solo work in the mid-70s when he was an "arena rocker". He originally became famous, however, as a young member of psychedelic era band The Herd and became a teen idol in Britain. Steve Marriott reportedly wanted to bring the 18-year-old Frampton into the Small Faces lineup but ended up starting Humble Pie with Frampton instead. After touring the US and Europe for two years, he left Humble Pie as the group was gaining popularity because of disdain for Marriott's hard living lifestyle and screaming boogie rock direction. Aside from his work with Humble Pie, other recordings of this era that feature Frampton include albums by Harry Nilsson, Jerry Lee Lewis, and George Harrison. His solo debut was 1972's Wind of Change, which did not fare well on the charts though receiving critical praise. It also featured appearances by musicians such as Ringo Starr and Mick Jones. Two more efforts by Frampton also struggled commercially, one released under the moniker Frampton's Camel. Constant touring began to create awareness of his talents, however, and 1974's Frampton LP went gold. It also peaked #32 on the Billboard 200 chart in the U.S., showing his growing international appeal. He finally gained lasting international fame by 1976 when his much-loved live album, Frampton Comes Alive! was released. Having built up his reputation on the road, the LP debuted at No. 1 on the charts in January 1976. It was long considered the best-selling live album of all time, moving over 16 million copies worldwide. In 1978, Peter suffered a near fatal car crash in the Bahamas, which left him with a concussion, muscle damage and broken bones. But in 1979, he released the album 'Where I Should Be', which went gold and produced the hit 'I Can't Stand It No More'. His extensive use of the Talk Box effect was and still is an integral part of the Peter Frampton experience. His albums never regained the high chart placements of the 70's era but he has continued his musical career none the less. Among the gimmicks he's employed to maintain interest have been releasing Frampton Comes Alive II, as well as joining Ringo Starr's touring revue, recording two CDs with ex-Stone Bill Wyman and
More at Last.fm

Concert Dates

No content available.

News

No content available.

Articles

Peter Frampton: Frampton Comes Alive ZigZag, Apr 1976

View Original

I MUST CONFESS before I go any further that I'm not very familiar with too many of Frampton's previous solo albums (I've only got one other one) although the stuff that I have heard sounded quite respectable without knocking me sideways. An awful lot of people would appear to feel more strongly about Frampton however, as this album is currently topping the Billboard chart in America and doing monster business.

View Original

With his youthful good looks and budding guitar hero image (tasteful, but with distinct heavy-metal inclinations), he seems to have captured a considerable proportion of the American pop and rock audience, including at one end of the scale the pubescent teenybop faction and at the other end, college students who see him as the new British rock guitar supremo. The fact that he manages to please them all and still retain some degree of integrity is highly commendable and quite remarkable, considering how one step too far in either direction could alienate half his audience immediately. He comes pretty close to blowing it a couple of times on this album, mind you, but it is a live album after all, and most of it is, in fact, very good indeed.

Frampton sings his impressive repertoire of songs and plays a mean guitar, his heavy looking band provide suitable accompaniment, and everybody cheers and screams to deafening effect.

The album, a double, was recorded at various venues in America, and the sound is excellent. Frampton devotees will obviously love it, and disbelievers, sceptics, ageing hippies, drunks and degenerates could well be in for a pleasant surprise.

Peter Frampton's Camel: A Galloping Success In The States Melody Maker, Jul 1973

View Original

PETER FRAMPTON made a flying visit to London last week. But the boss of Frampton's Camel couldn't stay long – too much excitement is happening for the band in the States.

View Original

In Biblical days, it was prophets who had great difficulty in gaining acceptance in their own land. For example, the Prophet Ezekial was frequently stoned. He didn't mind that too much. But when his countrymen hurled rocks at him as well, he decided it was time to quit and head for pastures new.

Peter hasn't exactly been rejected by England, but like many other local rock musicians, he has found that the grass is greener on the far side of the Atlantic.

Since quitting Humble Pie, Peter has been working on the slow process of building up his name as both a guitarist, singer and songwriter, and gaining acceptance for his first band. In the past he has always been either a sideman or co-partner. At last he is his own boss. And as he said last week: "I've never been happier."

Winds Of Change, his first solo album showed that Frampton had gained confidence as a singer, having been overshadowed by more powerful voices in the past. Now he has developed his own style, which has reached a new peak on the new Frampton's Camel album.

Looking more cheerful and enthusiastic than for a long time, he told me that the album was doing well in the American chart, and was getting plenty of radio plays.

"It's got a red dot beside it in the chart y'know, we like those red dots," smiled Pete.

"We thought it was going to be the sleeper of the week. The band has come on a lot since we made the album. John Siomos, the new drummer has worked out incredibly well. I met John in New York when I was looking for a drummer. We went to the States at Christmas without one, and were desperately ringing round. His was the 'phone that answered, and he's really fitted in well.

"We're just as laid back – more if anything. John is one of those Jim Gordon style drummers. When he does a fill, it's amazing, but not all the time. His technique is well together, and he's into all the Pretty Purdie things.

"He's not played with us in England yet, but I hope we can do that after our next tour of the States. We'll do a bit of work here. I don't know – it depends on how the album goes.

"We could do dates in London, but I think we would still need to play alongside somebody else here. And I have the feeling if we do Top Of The Pops, it could put us in the wrong category. But I wouldn't turn it down folks!

"I'm really pleased with the way it's all going. When we started, I didn't have too much confidence, but I'm learning a lot, and I'm happier singing on stage. Singing and playing at the same time is very hard – I have to think about it. One day I hope to do a concert, maybe with brass and strings, and sit on a stool and sing."

How did their last American tour fare?

"It was one of the most exciting I've ever done. We did some with Poco, who I hear have broken up, and some with J. Geils and Johnny Winter. We saw Leo Kottke and he's incredible – really. He sounds like three guitarists, on record. Live, he sounds like nine. The last day of the tour we did Winterland, LA, and as I walked on stage, the audience unrolled a big scroll which said: 'We came to see you Peter,' which was quite amazing. I couldn't believe it.

"It's nice when the band gets to be consistent, and you can feel confident when you walk on stage. There are bad nights, but mostly its pretty good. I think we're getting good reports on the grapevine. Ever since we, started, we have been described as a heavy Traffic, and old Mick Jagger came to see us play New York, which was really nice. We met up with Led Zeppelin, and they came to see us too.

"We're still doing 'Plain Shame', and 'The Light', and 'Lines On My Face', from the new LP. It's nice to get the audience quiet and listening, then we build up to a climax."

Some of the lyrics to Frampton's songs are very personal, about his own experiences. How did he feel about singing them when perhaps the original mood or circumstances had changed?

"Well they must have been important to me to write them, and when I sing a song like 'Lines On My Face', I just remember the mood I was in at the time. 'The Lodger' was another like that, about living in a flat. I find it easy enough to put myself into the original situation. If I didn't feel a song, then I wouldn't do it.

"When we first started the band, we didn't really know each other. Then you listen to what the others are playing and little by little, it works together into something else. We're happier, and the songs I'm writing are getting happier. But I can still write something very melancholy – around 8 am.

"The number that really goes down the best is 'Do You Feel Like We Do'. It's half instrumental, and I've got into scat singing with the guitar lately. So I do a bit of ooby-dooby."

Peter is diversifying his talents in an incredible burst of energy. Apart from producing his own albums, he is also working on an LP by a discovery – Roger Moon, a singer songwriter from Norfolk. He is producing Roger's album and playing on it as well. He is adding piano to his stage instrumentation, while on albums, Peter is also playing some excellent drums, on the. tracks laid down after Kelly, the original drummer' quit.

"I'd like to play drums onstage, but not yet. John and I would work something out with two drum kits. I'm having the proverbial ball at the moment. Isn't it marvellous to see Stevie Wonder doing so well? He's incredible. No, I haven't spoken to him, so I don't know what he thinks of my version of 'When I Fall In Love With You'.

"In September, we'll come back home and do my second album and the second Frampton's Camel album. We're supposed to do it now, but it's just a case of when to tour and when to record. I'd like to sit down for a few weeks and get it all sorted out."

Was it strange coming home to England, after spending so much time in the States?

"When I come home, I see Top Of The Pops and I really don't know what's going on here. Perhaps I should borrow Mary's tights (his wife), and sprinkle some glitter from the chemists on me head. I used to get screamed at, but when I think about it, I was very straight. All I wore was a sweater and tight trousers. Oh, and I used to wear make-up. Oh, isn't it stupid. Do you remember those pictures of me?"

It was hard to believe the days of the Herd, when Peter was a front page pin-up, was now nearly seven years ago.

"The English music scene is a bit of a mystery to me, both aurally and visually. But I get off on the way I work, and the music we're playing. They don't like all that glam and glitter in America. We've played with Slade and T. Rex, and that's all I will say. Really you have to start at the bottom and build up in the States."

Auctions

No content available.

No content available.

No content available.

Top Albums

Frampton Comes Alive cover art

Frampton Comes Alive

Buy Amazon.com     Buy iTunes    

more
less
Greatest Hits cover art

Greatest Hits

Buy Amazon.com     Buy iTunes    

more
less
Frampton Comes Alive! cover art

Frampton Comes Alive!

Buy Amazon.com     Buy iTunes    

more
less
Frampton cover art

Frampton

Buy Amazon.com     Buy iTunes    

more
less
more
less

Top Songs

Show Me The Way cover art

Show Me The Way

Buy Amazon.com     Buy iTunes    

Baby, I Love Your Way cover art

Baby, I Love Your Way

Buy Amazon.com     Buy iTunes    

Do You Feel Like We Do cover art

Do You Feel Like We Do

Buy Amazon.com     Buy iTunes    

Lines On My Face cover art

Lines On My Face

Buy Amazon.com     Buy iTunes    

I'm In You cover art

I'm In You

Buy Amazon.com     Buy iTunes    

Video

No content available.

Recommended Albums

more
less
more
less
more
less
more
less