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Artist: Pink Floyd

Pink Floyd

Bio

Pink Floyd are a psychedelic/progressive rock band formed in Cambridge, England, United Kingdom in 1965. Pink Floyd is one of rock's most successful and influential acts, having sold over 200 million albums worldwide and with 74.5 million certified units in the United States, making them one of the best-selling artists of all time. Currently the band consists of David Gilmour (vocals, guitar) and Nick Mason (drums). The band's classic lineup was Roger Waters (vocals, bass), David Gilmour (vocals, guitar), Rick Wright (organ, keyboards, vocals) and Nick Mason (drums). Gilmour was brought into the band in 1968 to replace the band's founder, singer, guitarist and songwriter Syd Barrett, who had become increasingly erratic and departed from the band a few months after Gilmour's addition. The band became known for their advancements in the genres of psychedelic rock and progressive rock music, philosophical lyrics, avant-garde compositions, sonic experimentation, innovative cover art and elaborate live shows. Pink Floyd enjoyed modest success in the late-1960s as a psychedelic band led by Syd Barrett. Barrett’s increasingly erratic behavior eventually caused his colleagues to replace him after The Piper at the Gates Of Dawn with guitarist David Gilmour. The band went on to record several elaborate concept albums; achieving worldwide success with 1973’s The Dark Side of the Moon (The second best-selling album of all time), 1975’s Wish You Were Here, 1977’s Animals, and 1979’s The Wall, among the best-selling, most critically acclaimed, and enduringly popular albums in rock music history. In 1985, singer and bassist Roger Waters declared Pink Floyd defunct. However, the remaining members continued recording and touring under the name, eventually reaching a settlement with Waters giving them rights to the name and most of the songs. Pink Floyd evolved from an earlier band, formed in 1964, which was at various times called Sigma 6, The Meggadeaths, The Screaming Abdabs, and The Abdabs. When this band split up, some members — guitarists Bob Klose and Roger Waters, drummer Nick Mason, and wind instrument player Rick Wright — formed a new band called Tea Set, and were joined shortly thereafter by guitarist Syd Barrett, who became the band’s primary vocalist as well. When Tea Set f
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News

Pink Floyd - The Endless River - Exclaim! (Reviews)

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Pink Floyd - The Endless River

Undoubtedly one of the most recognizable and influential acts in the history of rock music, Pink Floyd are putting a wrap on their storied career with The Endless River. Frontman David Gilmour and drummer Nick Mason have both confirmed that this will be the band's final record, based on over 20 hours of previously unreleased material recorded for their 1994 studio effort The Division Bell. Music from the Gilmour-led era has long been a point of contention among listeners, with many sorely missing the creative influence of Roger Waters after he left the group in 1985. Built...Read More

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Pink Floyd The Wall - St. Louis Riverfront Times (Event)

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7:00 p.m. August 7 - Some listeners find Pink Floyd's The Wall an impossible slog; others (the majority of us, given the album's staggering sales figures) think it a masterpiece, one that sticks to the darker hues of the emotional and psychological spectrum while always remaining musical. Making the unremi...

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El Monstero: a tribute to Pink Floyd - St. Louis Riverfront Times (Event)

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6:00 p.m. December 22 - From this 2012 feature: The promised apocalypse was not delivered. Not that such a paltry thing as the end of the world could stop El Monstero now. When all signs of humanity have been cast into the fi...

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Music of Pink Floyd - St. Louis Riverfront Times (Event)

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June 1 - At 8 p.m. on Saturday, June 1, the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra presents Music of Pink Floyd. Complemented by an eight-member rock band, the musicians of our top-tier hometown orchestra go exploring in the Floydean realm. Selections from Dark Side of the Moon and The Wall, amo...

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Articles

Pink Floyd: Echoes – The Best Of Mojo, Dec 2001

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GLOOMY BUGGERS, the Floyd. War, death, bitter childhood, alienation, indoctrination, madness, greed, vicious animal husbandry, imprisonment, old age and, inevitably, death. Hi ho, it's off to work we go.

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Yet, somehow, there's something supremely uplifting about them, which maybe has to do with their music's deep roots in the blues, music devoted to finding resolve in your sorrow. Nonetheless, much of their work appears to have been designed to provoke a crimp in the nape and a clenching of the jaw. I knew someone who liked to have sex to 'Echoes'. He never got laid twice. Died young too. True story.

You realise, of course, that this package has a beady eye on The Beatles' 1 market, so there have to be loads of songs you can instantly call to mind, to make it a "This'll shut Dad up" Christmas purchase. So the best-known half of Dark Side Of The Moon ('Money', 'Time', 'Great Gig In The Sky', 'Us And Them') is present and 'Another Brick In The Wall' and no alarms, no surprises. No 'Scream Thy Last Scream', no 'Apples And Oranges', no live version of 'Careful With That Axe, Eugene'. The only rarity is a first-time-on-CD appearance of 'When The Tigers Broke Free', possibly the oddest, bleakest, dullest single ever released by anyone ever. So that's a treat.

In our house, any 'best of' the Floyd would contain 'Grantchester Meadows' from Ummagumma, 'Mudmen' and 'Free Four' from Obscured By Clouds, 'Remergence' (the end of Atom Heart Mother) and 'The Nile Song' from More. None of those (admittedly rough-hewn) tracks, or indeed those LPs, are represented here, which is kind of a shame, because that transitional period has some of the Floyd's sweetest, most naive moments. Apart from its very last song, there's nothing particularly sweet or naive about this collection. This is the stately, grandiloquent side of Floyd, full of morbid dread and simplistic bass lines. What, then, will the family be whistling this Yuletide? Three from Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, 'Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Sun' and 'Jugband Blues' from Saucerful Of Secrets, 'One Of These Days' and the mighty 'Echoes' from Meddle, two helpings of Wish You Were Here, one from Animals, a few from The Wall and, mercifully, only one track from The Final Cut, a gruesome record only a mother could love which, inexplicably, used to be played constantly in the trendy hairdressers I used to attend in West Hampstead. I am now almost entirely bald. True story.

But whatever this selection might have been, what it is is beautifully remastered and carefully sequenced, allowing unexpected juxtapositions to throw up nice effects. The second half of Disc One is a marvel, a not particularly fabulous bunch of songs strengthened by their proximity to one another. And until 'When The Tigers Broke Free' comes along to piss in your ear, Disc Two sounds fantastic, with 'Shine On', 'Time' and 'Comfortably Numb' creating a discomforting portrait of the band – the absence of Barrett, the strange subsequent void at their heart, their search for purpose and direction, their eventual disillusionment. Because, for all the Floyd's reticence about engaging with their public, there's been a lot of autobiography in the music; that Void In The Floyd has been keenly explored. Whether it's Roger's fatherless upbringing ('Tigers' again), their dismay at the fate of Syd ('Shine On You Crazy Diamond') or a general malaise at their own destiny as reluctant superstars (almost everything from 'Free Four' onwards) there's been a whole lot of self-loathing – of Blues – goin' on. And this selection lays itself out like a life-story, a novel, the picaresque journey of Mr Pink Floyd, complete with flashbacks and faded illustrations.

Disc Two climaxes with the soaring 'High Hopes', what looks like being the final expression of their moody majesty, the last track from the last Pink Floyd album. But there's one final twist: as the closing chord decays, a bell rings and up pops a flashback of young Syd Barrett to sing 'Bike', a genuinely cheerful, pleasantly bathetic coda to a brilliant career. You could argue it gently mocks everything that's gone before it, or you might feel it simply says, 'Don't worry, life's not as glum as we make out.' Then you remember what became of the fellow who's singing.

"I know a room of musical tunes," he goes, outlining the group's methods until the very end. "Some rhyme, some ching, most of them are clockwork. Let's go into the other room and make them work." There follows a tortured cacophony of grinding gears, bells and mangles.

That's Pink Floyd, that is. Bye bye, boys, thank you for sharing. Have a nice death.

Pink Floyd: The Dark Side Of The Moon Rolling Stone, May 1973

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ONE OF BRITAIN'S most successful and long lived avant-garde rock bands, Pink Floyd emerged relatively unsullied from the mire of mid-'60s British psychedelic music as early experimenters with outer-space concepts.

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Although that phase of the band's development was of short duration, Pink Floyd have from that time been the pop scene's preeminent techno-rockers: four musicians with a command of electronic instruments who wield an arsenal of sound effects with authority and finesse. While Pink Floyd's albums were hardly hot tickets in the shops, they began to attract an enormous following through their US tours. They have more recently developed a musical style capable of sustaining their dazzling and potentially overwhelming sonic wizardry.

The Dark Side of the Moon is Pink Floyd's ninth album and is a single extended piece rather than, a collection of songs. It seems to deal primarily with the fleetingness and depravity of human life, hardly the commonplace subject matter of rock. 'Time' ("The time is gone the song is over"), 'Money' ("Share it fairly but don't take a slice of my pie"). And 'Us And Them' ("Forward he cried from the rear") might be viewed as the keys to understanding the meaning (if indeed there is any definite meaning) of The Dark Side of the Moon.

Even though this is a concept album, a number of the cuts can stand on their own. 'Time' is a fine country-tinged rocker with a powerful guitar solo by David Gilmour and 'Money' is broadly and satirically played with appropriately raunchy sax playing by Dick Parry, who also contributes a wonderfully-stated, breathy solo to 'Us And Them'. The non-vocal 'On The Run' is a standout with footsteps racing from side to side successfully eluding any number of odd malevolent rumbles and explosions only to be killed off by the clock's ticking that leads into 'Time'. Throughout the album the band lays down a solid framework which they embellish with synthesizers, sound effects and spoken voice tapes. The sound is lush and multi-layered while remaining clear and well-structured.

There are a few weak spots. David Gilmour's vocals are sometimes weak and lackluster and 'The Great Gig in the Sky' (which closes the first side) probably could have been shortened or dispensed with, but these are really minor quibbles. The Dark Side of the Moon is a fine album with a textural and conceptual richness that not only invites, but demands involvement. There is a certain grandeur here that exceeds mere musical melodramatics and is rarely attempted in rock. The Dark Side of the Moon has flash – the true flash that comes from the excellence of a superb performance.

Top Albums

The Dark Side Of The Moon cover art

The Dark Side Of The Moon

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Wish You Were Here cover art

Wish You Were Here

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The Wall cover art

The Wall

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The Division Bell cover art

The Division Bell

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Animals cover art

Animals

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Top Songs

Wish You Were Here cover art

Wish You Were Here

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Money cover art

Money

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Comfortably Numb cover art

Comfortably Numb

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Time cover art

Time

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The Great Gig in the Sky cover art

The Great Gig in the Sky

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Hey You cover art

Hey You

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Us and Them cover art

Us and Them

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Recommended Songs

Bohemian Rhapsody cover art

Bohemian Rhapsody by Queen

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